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View Full Version : Fiona's Mini Pigment liner Guide


Fiona
01-10-2011, 01:14 PM
I wrote this on my journal, and I thought it was worth re-posting here :)

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_cQWrikiU5Bw/TStcGzUzPsI/AAAAAAAAAB0/Y-MJcmm05CQ/s1600/pens.jpg

Here's my collection of pigment liner pens. It's a bit of an obsession. I think they get a bad wrap from some artists, who poo poo them for not being hardcore enough (because drawing isn't hard enough?!?). Not me. I've tried using traditional nib pens, but I'm far too impatient to let things dry properly and I don't like cleaning-up after myself. I also like the freedom of being able to ink anywhere I go.

Here are my favorite brands and why I love them:

Staedtler Pigment Liner
The reason I love Staedtler is because they're cheap, everywhere, and pretty great. I haven't tried the professional series, they tend to be more money then I'm willing to spend on pigment liners, but the regular Staedtler pens are great, they don't get runny, and if you leave then around for a few years they won't dry-up. The only thing I don't like about these pens is that they will run if you use markers overtop. All and all they make inking easier, faster, and are very reliable.

Copic Multiliner SP
If you can get these they're pretty sweet. I like the SP liner over the regular pens because they're refillable. They cost about $7-8 Canadian (I suppose American as well), and have an aluminum body. If you treat them well they will last years. Again, they're reliable, don't dry-out, and you can use markers overtop. If your working on paper, virtually nothing will make them bleed. I've had my set for years, and I've never broken a tip. If I did brake a tip I also buy a replacement. Furthermore, the BS tip brush is the best painterly brush I've ever used (even better then the Sakura Micron BR brush). Not too shabby huh?

Sakura Micron
Here's the industry favorite. Sakura microns are great. Out of the three they have the best ink. If you use microns with acid free paper you will have art the lasts a really REALLY long time. Like the other two they never get runny, and like copic ink you can use markers overtop. Furthermore, they're about half the price of the copic sp pens. Whucha! The only problem I've ever had with them ruining the tips. If your not gentle you can push nibby bit back into the pen, making it impossible to write with. Also, I recently found the Sakura Microperm pens, which as far as I can tell are the same as micron's but have different packaging.

So go get inking!

afroXcore
01-10-2011, 01:45 PM
i don't really like using my pigment liners, i had to do projects in class with them, i hated how they'd run out of ink rather quickly.

I used Pitt pens for a while, mostly because i found that i could reload them with some india ink, but i really still like using the old fashioned pen nibs.

Professor Az
01-10-2011, 01:48 PM
I think they get a bad wrap from some artists, who poo poo them for not being hardcore enough (because drawing isn't hard enough?!?). Not me. I've tried using traditional nib pens, but I'm far too impatient to let things dry properly and I don't like cleaning-up after myself. I also like the freedom of being able to ink anywhere I go.

True dat. There is a whole "you gotta buy (INSERT NAME OF JAPANESE PEN HERE) to be the best!" mentality out there that makes me want to scream, especially among the How-to-Draw-Manga crowd. Their cries of G-pen this, Tachikawa-pen that are all meant to get you to buy more of their stuff, not about making you better at your craft.

It's simply not true. If it works for you, and is easy to use, and above all, cheap, then that's the best inking tool, IMHO. This is coming from an inker and nib user, mind you. Yeah, yeah, India ink is forever, but honestly, everything that comes across my drawing table lately gets scanned, and then worked digitally, so I don't see an overwhelming need for super permanence anymore.

Besides, pigment liners won't ruin a pair of pants, or white carpet when you drop one. Try seeing what a whole bottle of Speedball Super Black will do to a room if you spill it.

Edit: afroXcore ninja-ed my post. :P

Fiona
01-10-2011, 02:27 PM
i don't really like using my pigment liners, i had to do projects in class with them, i hated how they'd run out of ink rather quickly.

I used Pitt pens for a while, mostly because i found that i could reload them with some india ink, but i really still like using the old fashioned pen nibs.

If they're running out, you're not buying good quality pens. I've done 50 pictures or more with one pen.

Prof: That's why I don't like india ink much! I have ruined too many table tops and pairs of pants! Not to mention countless blotchy pictures. Inking with nips takes longer when you take into account precision and clean-up time. I'm always looking for ways to take an extra 10 mins off the clock.

Professor Az
01-10-2011, 03:44 PM
Prof: That's why I don't like india ink much! I have ruined too many table tops and pairs of pants! Not to mention countless blotchy pictures. Inking with nips takes longer when you take into account precision and clean-up time. I'm always looking for ways to take an extra 10 mins off the clock.

Don't get me wrong, inks done up with nibs certainly have their place, such as professional inks for a client that they are going to hang in an office, or in their home. India ink doesn't bleed into the paper, or turn brown the way some pigment liners can do, and it reproduces in print better, too. But if all you are doing is learning how to ink, I would then start off slow with something easy to use, then move up to nibs if that's what you truly want to work with..

afroXcore
01-10-2011, 08:50 PM
i get more dynamic lines with nibs myself, since they respond better to pressure. i really don't mind getting crap dirty with a bottle of ink, although i do have a carpet that's already seen the worst an art student could do to it.

i used the Staedtler pigment liners, and have little experience with the sakura pens. it just makes a clumsy looking line for me.

Threes
10-12-2011, 12:20 PM
ok its official - nibs are my favorite ink thingies.

Well they aren't very easy to tote around (and the disposable fountain pens just dont feel the same) and they arent practical for a quick sketch at a coffee shop... but they are definitely very versatile and have a vastly greater line width variance than a liner or pen.

I like the fact that you can change the dilution of the ink, you can wipe away excess pigment if there is too much saturation on a line, you can adjust the nib itself, and that the ink doesnt wash away or diffuse (unless its water based, but at any rate, that can give a really neat look on its own.)

i used to swear by sakura pens, i always carried around a pack of black with varying widths, but lately i've just been using ballpoint pens and sharpie pens. Ballpoint can give a neat shaded look thats rougher than felt tip; sharpie pens are cheap, convenient, and very black, and dont tend to bleed or fade.

I did go on a sharpie marker kick for a while, just loving the wild and unpredictable line i could get with them... but the smell set off my migraines and i cant use them often now.